Scottish Kilts - Irish Kilts

Kilt Philosophy: The best way to get things right is for the store to work one-on-one with each customer. Shopping cart systems are not effective for a kilt because there are so many variables and the first-time kilt buyer can easily make a mistake. Find a company who is good at communicating and let them be your guide through the process. Read on for basic information on kilts.

If you're just discovering tartans, start with the Tartan 101 page. You can access images on the Tartan Master List.

Linda Clifford is retiring at the end of 2014 and we are referring our kilt clients to:

Irish Traditions
(Yes, they do Scottish Tartans as well)
Annapolis, MD
410-990-4747
Mon-Sat 10-6 / Sun 11-5
Ask for Margaret or Joanie
irish_traditions@verizon.net

A kilt is an investment that will last longer than any garment in your closet, and it will never go out of style. You can wear it on a hike or to a formal ball. Dress it up or down, it goes anywhere.

The traditional art of kiltmaking is a combination of unique sewing skills and geometry that takes years to master.

Regulation Kilts are made of 100% Worsted Wool and have 8 running yards of tartan. Most kiltmakers use three buckle & leather strap closures. Some will use two.

Kilts vary in price depending on the tartan, weight & your measurements.

 

Scottish Kilts Irish Kilts
Scottish Kilts Detail

Pleating & Length

Most kilts are made so that the sett (repeating pattern) of the tartan is reproduced in the pleats. This is called "pleating to the sett" as shown in the photos here. Military style kilts can be "pleated to the stripe" so that a narrow bright stripe appears in each pleat. Not all tartans are suitable for pleating to the stripe. Ask your kiltmaker.

Mercifully, the hemline of the kilt is not subject to the whims of French fashion. It should be worn just below the top of the knee.


 

 


Copyright © Linda Clifford Scottish & Irish Merchant